Independent Filmmakers Festival kicks off at King’s

The Halifax Independent Filmmakers Festival kicked off this weekend with a screening of Battleship Potemkin at the University of King’s College, just in time for students to experience the festival before exams.

The audience at Alumni Hall after the screening of Battleship Potmekin (Helen Pike photo)

By Helen Pike

The Halifax Independent Filmmakers Festival began this weekend with a screening of Battleship Potemkin at the University of King’s College, just in time for students to experience the festival before exams.

The event, which was modelled after last year’s successful screening of Metropolis, also featured a live improvised performance by Halifax jazz and experimental musicians.

“This was kind of the brainchild, this year at least, of the History of Science and Technology Society at King’s. We were kind of deciding, over beer one night, at our society meetings that we needed to have a movie night,” says Charles Bourne, who helped organize the event.

The screening is not only a fun and interesting experience, but it has also helped to bring various parts of the community and universities in Halifax together. The event was organized and supported by parts of King’s, Dal, and even NSCAD.

“We need that to happen, otherwise it will just be a fizzly movie night, and that is fun but it is not a big event and it is not really a community event if you don’t have lots of groups working on it,” says Bourne. He is excited the event has turned into such a big project, and that it is officially part of HIFF.

The festival is in its sixth year, and promises an interesting lineup featuring more than 75 films as well as 20 events and artist talks. It runs from Apr. 10-14.

Sillouette of stand-up bass player Lucas Pearse playing at Alumni Hall. (Helen Pike photo)

“We really concentrate on the short film,” says Sarah MacLeod, an organizer of the festival this year. “We are free from commercial agenda, meaning we are strictly for the celebration of the film.”

She says the festival concentrates on Atlantic-made films, but also showcases work from around the world.

“Our opening film is The Forgotten Space by Allan Sekula and Noel Burch and they live in Paris,” says Macleod. “It is kind of an experimental film essay on shipping and kind of the whole shipping industry, so it is really timely with Halifax and getting the Irving contract.”

 

Related Audio 

Charles B

Charles Bourne talks about the Battleship Potemkin screening.