Wearable art hits runway with NSCAD student’s show

NSCAD University’s 22nd annual Wearable Art Show took place last Saturday at the Halifax Forum, showcasing students’ original and creative art pieces on the runway.

By Michelle Cameron

NSCAD University’s 22nd annual Wearable Art Show took place last Saturday at the Halifax Forum, showcasing students’ original and creative art pieces on the runway.

The award-winning fashion and art show has become  a greatly anticipated cultural event in Halifax. This year there were around 20 designers from NSCAD’S Textile and Fashion Department, ready to present their exclusive creations.

“The focus is on art that’s fashionable and wearable as opposed to just clothes on the runway. Here you have both together, which is what makes it so cool,” says Nicole Dnistrianskyi the organizer of this year’s show.

The runway for the NSCAD Wearable Art show. (Ivy Jones photo)

The show debuted everything from feather headpieces to gowns made from children’s books. The tickets cost $15 for students and $20 otherwise, and the proceeds went to both the AIDS Coalition of Nova Scotia and the Wearable Art Scholarship for NSCAD students.

Daniel MacCaulay, this year’s winner of the Wearable Art Scholarship, says he spent months working on his collection entitled, “Out of Context.”

“I knew to expect organic and hipster styles from NSCAD students,” says MacCaulay. “I think there’s a kind of faux-pas when it comes to leather, especially at NSCAD, so while I wanted to be different, I also wanted to portray high-end clothing that was original.”

The Wearable Art Scholarship’s purpose is to reimburse students for the money spent on their pieces. However, the scholarship did not cover the $600 MacCaulay spent on leather, lace and chain materials for his collection.

Models from left to right are Steph Moewan, Kendra MacCaulay, Brad Johnston, and Matt Capstick with designer Daniel MacCaulay seen centre, backstage at the show. (Matt Capstick photo)

“I’ve been thinking about this collection since October, so I wanted to put everything into this show. My collection is both fashion focused but artistic because some of the pieces are completely useless, but just look awesome,” says MacCaulay.

Model and designer Sophie Golets says the beauty of the Wearable Art Show is that it doesn’t have to cost that much money at all. Since Golets is a King’s Student taking fashion at NSCAD for an elective, she says she didn’t want to spend a lot on her piece.

“I took the emphasis off being a perfectionist and focused on really experimenting with materials and my creativity.”

Golets focused on being artistic, making a skirt from wooden hoops plastered with colourful fabrics.  She also modeled someone else’s piece,  a cotton dress embroidered with pennies.

“There was such a spectrum of wearable creativity at the show,” says Golets. “NSCAD is the only place I’ve seen something like this. It’s not just about creating trendy clothing, but it also allows people to experiment.”

The Wearable Art Show showcases local talent that is both artistic and fashionable to admire and to wear.

 

 

michelle’s autoSophie Golets talks about what she looks for in The Wearable Art Show.